Notice: DUE TO COVID-19, CONSULTATIONS ARE AVAILABLE VIA PHONE OR VIDEO conference AND consultation FEES ARE TEMPORARILY WAIVED. CALL TODAY!

What Is an NMSN?

After a Pasadena divorce, noncustodial parents will be required to pay child support. Medical support for minor children is often included as part of a child support order. Medical support refers to the responsibility to provide health insurance coverage for a dependent child.

If you are required to provide health insurance for your children as part of your child support order, your employer will receive a copy of the National Medical Support Notice (NMSN). All states use the NMSN, so your employer may receive multiple copies if you have children living in more than one state.

There are two parts to the NMSN. Your employer completes part A, which confirms that insurance is offered as part of your employment. The administrator of the health insurance plan completes part B, which verifies the cost and coverage options.

Even if your employer normally allows open enrollment into company insurance plans once per year, an exception must be made for enrolling children covered under the NMSN.

As long as your employer's insurance plan is considered affordable, you must comply with the NMSN and provide coverage for your children. A plan is considered affordable unless child support and medical support would exceed 50% of your net disposable earnings.

An employer who does not provide insurance benefits to any employees does not need to offer a group plan because of the NMSN. It is against the law for your employer to fire you or retaliate against you because of the NMSN. California law says you may bring a civil action against your employer if you are the victim of such discriminatory practices.

How Can We Help?

If you need assistance dealing with your medical support obligation or any other child support related issue, please call our office at (626) 683-8113 or email us at info@PasadenaLawOffice.com. Our experienced Pasadena family lawyers are eager to help noncustodial parents make sure they are being treated fairly by the state's family court system.

Categories